Tire Anatomy

 

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According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA), over 78,000 car accidents are caused each year from tire failure, including blowouts and flat tires. We need to do our part to keep from becoming a statistic. We will look over the next couple blogs at the makeup of a tire, the importance of alignment, proper maintenance, and tire selection.

Anatomy of a Tire
Everyone knows that tires are constructed from rubber but there are many more layers to the modern tire.

tire anatomy

1- Inner liner:

An airtight layer of synthetic rubber.  This is a smooth layer that when pressed against the rim and sealed creates a chamber to hold air like the older sealed inner tubes.  Rims that don’t use inner tubes perform much better than their predecessor. The inside layer is what will be patched in the event of a puncture by your local mechanic.

2- Carcass Ply:

The layer above the inner liner, consisting of thin textile fiber cords (or cables) bonded into the rubber. These cables largely determine the strength of the tire and help it resist pressure. The denser the cords the more pressure the tire can hold. Fiber is used in this level because it won’t snap or bend as easily as the rigid metal of the belts would.

3- Beads:

They clamp firmly against the tire’s rim to ensure an airtight fit and keep the tire properly seated on the rim. The seal between the bead and the rim is crucial to forming the air tight seal.

4- Sidewall:

It protects the side of the tire from impact with curbs and the road. Important details about the tire are written on the sidewall, such as tire size and speed rating. Since this area of the tire doesn’t have any belts it is much easier to puncture. It is also one of the spots on the tire that you can not repair should you puncture the sidewall.  These can be made with different colors of rubber, most notably white giving us “white walls” that were popular in the 50’s.

5- Crown plies (or belts):

It largely determines the strength of the tire. It’s made up of very fine, resistant steel cords bonded into the rubber. This means the tire can resist the strains of turning, and doesn’t expand due to the rotation of the tire. It’s also flexible enough to absorb deformations caused by bumps, potholes and other obstacles in the road.  Most tires use 3 layers of belts for increased strength. Some off road tires us as many as 6 layers. Tire companies have been experimenting with using Kevlar as an outer layer to provide a higher level of puncture protection.

6-Tread:

It provides traction and turning grip for the tire and is designed to resist wear, abrasion and heat.  Some tires are able to rotate either direction and some are unidirectional based on the tread pattern. Different depths of tread and tread patterns perform differently in varying weather and surface conditions.

We will spend the next blog looking at different wear patterns in the tread that can be caused by our car being out of alignment.  We will also take a look at how much tread is legal to pass NC State inspection.

If you need assistance with repairing a tire or buying a new set, we are happy to help! Just call us at (910) 483-2958 or stop by our shop at 7611 Clinton Road, Stedman, NC.

Summer means peak season for lawn mowing! If you’re in the market for a new mower or you’re unsure of what to buy next but you know you need a new mower, come see all the Husqvarna we have in stock! From zero-turn, to riding, to even push mowers, we can find the right fit for what you need. And if you need more tools for the outdoors, make sure you see all the trimmers, edgers, blowers and chainsaws that we have as well.

Please follow our Facebook page for updates as well as our website. We’re always here to answer your question or to be off service. Never hesitate to reach out if you need us.

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